Configuration

The wrapper code generator is an annotation processor, provided by the codegen-wrapping module.

The maven configuration looks like this:

pom.xml
<dependencies>
	<dependency>
		<groupId>org.eclipse.serializer</groupId>
		<artifactId>codegen-wrapping</artifactId>
		<version>1.2.0</version>
	</dependency>
</dependencies>

<build>
	<plugins>
		<plugin>
			<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
			<artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
			<version>3.8.1</version>
			<configuration>
				<source>11</source>
				<target>11</target>
				<encoding>UTF-8</encoding>
				<annotationProcessors>
					<annotationProcessor>org.eclipse.serializer.codegen.wrapping.WrapperProcessor</annotationProcessor>
				</annotationProcessors>
				<compilerArgs>
					<arg>-Awrapper.types=org.eclipse.serializer.persistence.types.PersistenceStoring</arg>
				</compilerArgs>
			</configuration>
		</plugin>
	</plugins>
</build>

There are following ways to get the base wrapper types generated. If you want it for your own types, the best way is to use the GenerateWrapper annotation.

@GenerateWrapper
public interface MyInterface
{
	public void doStuff();

	public String getStuff();
}

Or, if you want it for interfaces in libraries, like PersistenceStoring, you cannot add an annotation. That’s what the microstream.wrapper.types parameter is for. This is just a comma separated list of types. Alternatively you can use the GenerateWrapperFor annotation:

@GenerateWrapperFor("org.eclipse.serializer.persistence.types.PersistenceStoring")
public class WrapperGenerationDummy
{
}

It accepts a list of type names. Plain strings have to be used instead of class literals, because it is read inside the compilation cycle which prohibits access to class elements.